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Here Is How To Track Your Mail-In Ballot

After nearly a full year of drama surrounding the legitimacy of mail-in voting, it’s understandable that many voters are wary about the safety of their vote. With new resources put in place to make voters feel more secure about their mail-in votes, voters can rest assured that their votes will be counted on Election Day next week.

Only a few states around the country have implemented widespread mail-in voting systems in the past, and since many are voting by mail for the first time this year, there’s been a lot of misinformation floating around the web. In the past, checking on the status of your mail in ballot didn’t seem like a requirement for many voters, but today many are wary of casting a mail-in vote without the ability to check on if their vote made it back to their county clerk office to be counted. The good news is that, while many states are new to mail-in voting, they’ve also newly implemented ways for voters to track their ballots and assure that they’re counted.

However, there are also some simple mistakes that could get your mail-in ballot rejected by your county clerk once it arrives. Things like not filling out your ballot in black or blue ink, returning a ballot with additional markings on it (like, say, your toddler gets ahold of it with a crayon), returning your ballot in a different envelope than you were given, returning your ballot too late, or signing your ballot with a signature that does not match the one on your drivers license could all qualify your ballot for rejection once it arrives at your county clerk.

If my mail-in ballot is not counted, can I then vote in person on Election Day?

For most states, once you’ve requested a mail-in or absentee ballot, you cannot vote in person unless you bring your mail-in ballot to your polling location and request a provisional ballot instead. We recommend reading up on your states’ laws on provisional ballots, since they tend to differ. Provisional ballots are counted once your local election officials have been able to verify that you are eligible to vote and have not voted already—but some research suggests that they may not be a good voting strategy.

Have you mailed your ballot in? Here’s how you can check on whether it made it to where it needed to go. Track your ballot by clicking on your corresponding state. States that require ballots to be postmarked before Election Day must have ballots postmarked by November 2nd. Ballots that must be postmarked by Election Day must be postmarked by November 3rd. Ballots that must be received by Election Day must arrive to an election official before November 3rd. Some states allowed mail-in voting, but the deadline to request a ballot has passed. If you are unsure whether you can still request a mail-in ballot, we suggest looking it up on your state’s listed website.

Alabama: Mail in ballots are available by request but must be postmarked before Election Day.

Alaska: Mail in ballots are available by request but must be postmarked by Election Day.

Arizona: Voters should have been given applications for mail-in ballots. Mail-in ballots must be received by Election Day.

Arkansas: Mail in ballots available to registered voters upon request, but must be received by Election Day.

California: Widespread mail-in voting. Votes must be postmarked by Election Day.

Colorado: Widespread mail-in voting. Votes must be received by Election Day.

Connecticut: Voters could request a mail-in ballot through a mailed application. Ballots must arrive before Election Day.

Delaware: Voters could request a mail-in ballot through a mailed application. Ballots must arrive before Election Day.

Florida: Mail-in ballots available to registered voters upon request, but must be received by Election Day.

Georgia: Mail-in ballots available to registered voters upon request, but must be received by Election Day.

Hawaii: Widespread mail-in voting. Votes must be received by Election Day.

Idaho: Absentee ballots were available upon request, but your ballot must be received by Election Day.

Illinois: Mail-in ballots were available upon request, but your ballot must be postmarked by Election Day.

Indiana: Some voters are eligible to vote by mail. Eligible mail-in votes must be postmarked before Election Day.

Iowa: Mail-in ballots were available upon request, but your ballot must be postmarked before Election Day.

Kansas: Mail-in ballots were available upon request, but your ballot must be postmarked by Election Day.

Kentucky: Mail-in ballots were available upon request, but your ballot must be postmarked by Election Day.

Louisiana: Eligible voters can request a mail-in ballot before October 30th, but mail-in ballots must be received before Election Day.

Maine: Mail-in ballots are available upon request, but ballots must be received by Election Day.

Maryland: Mail-in ballots were available by application, but ballots must be postmarked by Election Day.

Massachusetts: Mail-in ballots were available by application, but ballots must be postmarked by Election Day.

Michigan: Mail-in ballots were available by application, but ballots must be received by Election Day.

Minnesota: Mail-in ballots were available by application, but ballots must be postmarked by Election Day.

Mississippi: Eligible voters could request a mail-in ballot, but mail-in ballots must be postmarked before Election Day.

Missouri: Mail-in ballots are available upon request, but ballots must be received by Election Day.

Montana: Mail-in ballots are available upon request, but ballots must be received by Election Day.

Nebraska: Mail-in ballots are available upon request, but ballots must be received by Election Day.

Nevada: Widespread mail-in voting to active voters. Votes must be postmarked by Election Day.

New Hampshire: Mail-in ballots are available upon request, but ballots must be received by Election Day.

New Jersey: Widespread mail-in voting to active voters. Votes must be postmarked by Election Day.

New Mexico: Mail-in ballots are available upon request, but ballots must be received by Election Day.

New York: Mail-in ballots are available upon request, but ballots must be received by Election Day.

North Carolina: Mail-in ballots are available upon request, but ballots must be postmarked by Election Day.

North Dakota: Mail-in ballots are available upon request, but ballots must be postmarked before Election Day.

Ohio: Mail-in ballots were available upon request, but ballots must be postmarked before Election Day.

Oklahoma: Mail-in ballots are available upon request, but ballots must be received by Election Day.

Oregon: Widespread mail-in voting, but ballots must be received by Election Day.

Pennsylvania: Mail-in ballots were available upon request, but ballots must be postmarked by Election Day.

Rhode Island: Mail-in ballots are available upon request, but ballots must be received by Election Day.

South Carolina: Mail-in ballots are available upon request, but ballots must be received by Election Day.

South Dakota: Mail-in ballots are available upon request, but ballots must be received by Election Day.

Tennessee: Mail-in ballots were available to some by application, but ballots must be received by Election Day.

Texas: Mail-in ballots were available to some by application, but ballots must be received by the day after Election Day.

Utah: Widespread mail-in voting, but ballots must be postmarked before Election Day.

Vermont: Widespread mail-in voting. Ballots must be delivered before Election Day.

Virginia: Mail-in ballots are available upon request, but ballots must be postmarked by Election Day.

Washington: Widespread mail-in voting, but ballots must be postmarked by Election Day.

West Virginia: Mail-in ballots were available upon request, but ballots must be postmarked by Election Day.

Wisconsin: Mail-in ballots were available upon request, but ballots must be received by Election Day.

Wyoming: Mail-in ballots are available upon request, but ballots must be received by Election Day.

Puerto Rico: Puerto Rico does not have electoral college votes. Voters in Puerto Rico can request to vote by mail, and eligible voters must have postmarked their ballots by Election Day.

Washington, D.C.: Washington, D.C. has three electoral votes. Voters could request a mail-in ballot. and ballots must be received by November 13th.